Archives for the Month of October, 2010

But…

Charming and Well-Adjusted / Wellcome Images

Charming and Well-Adjusted / Wellcome Images

Despite my stroke, I am charming and well-adjusted.

Who’s Talking?

Who's Talking? / Wellcome Images

Who's Talking? / Wellcome Images

Sometimes I say the wrong words now. Right after my stroke, it was common.

When the words coming out of your mouth are not what you intend, who is talking?

Brace Bash

Italian Splints 1914-18 / Wellcome Images

Italian Splints 1914-18 / Wellcome Images

If your ankle doesn’t work properly, you will trip when you walk. Then you have to wear a huge brace which holds your foot and leg in a 90° angle, in an “L.”

Every stroke victim I’ve met hates their ankle brace. They are big and clunky, like the ones in this picture.

I got mine off, because I’m a stubborn bastard.

Real Type

Typing 1927 / Wellcome Images

Typing 1927 / Wellcome Images

Fake Type

I wrote this post using voice-activated software. If you have only one usable hand, talking to your computer is better than poking at it with a finger. The software takes a while to recognize your voice, but after a while it does the job.

Sometimes, though, it makes silly mistakes.  I told my computer “existential crisis” and it heard “Texas dental crisis.”

Visible

Diagram of the eye 1572 / Wellcome Images

Diagram of the eye 1572 / Wellcome Images

Invisible

Eye / Library of Congress

Eye / Library of Congress

If you imagine your eye as a clock, then my vision is empty from five o’clock to six.  I don’t see a black space; my brain fills it in with the colors of visible areas nearby.  What is actually there is invisible to me. This damage is not to my eyes, but to my brain’s understanding of vision.

Big things are not the problem. The menace is toddlers running straight at me; they disappeared into thin air.

Brain Food

1900 English Tonic / Wellcome Images

1900 English Tonic / Wellcome Images

Drug Military

Doctors have given me a drug the military has tested on pilots. It is supposed to make you alert, even for long periods. I don’t like it. It make you feel like someone else is running your body.

The first time I tried it, my friend Wendy called. I didn’t tell her about the drug. Out of the blue, she said, “You sound really…on.”

One brain view

Phrenological diagrams 1818 / Wellcome Images

Phrenological diagrams 1818 / Wellcome Images